Spring: A Journal of Archetype and Culture and Spring Journal Books
$ 32.95

Jung in the Academy
The Fordham Lectures 100 Years Later

by Edited by Mark E. Mattson, Frederick J. Wertz, Harry Fogarty, Margaret Klenck, and Beverley Zabriskie

ISBN: 978-1-935528-71-5
312 pp.

C. G. Jung delivered a ground-breaking and influential series of lectures at Fordham University in 1912. In many ways, the lectures laid out the future development of his work as well as his movement away from Freud. Fordham University, in collaboration with the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association of New York, honored the 1912 Jung lectures with a conference that sought to locate Jung in the Academy and beyond—in the years when the lectures were delivered and published, in today’s academic and clinical world, and into the future, with speculations and insights into the trends of psychological and scientific research and understanding. This book is an expanded proceedings of this conference, and gives us hope—hope that Jungian thought is alive in the Academy, where both will find enrichment, hope that the misunderstandings and old wounds within the depth psychological world may finally be healed, and hope for even more fruitful conversation among current scientific explorations, theological reflections, political concerns, and analytical psychology.
*****
Praise for Jung in the Academy and Beyond
Psychoanalysis, as a general method of psychological research and heuristic principle of the first rank in the domain of the human sciences, was the manifesto of the Fordham lectures of 1912 whereby Jung set out to make peace with men of science. Jung, aged 37, acted as ambassador for the nascent discipline of psychoanalysis. At the same time, he took the opportunity to promote his own revisionist hypotheses, in particular, the substitution of psychic energy for Freud’s term of sexual libido. Sonu Shamdasani, as quoted in the current book, suggests that the theoretical differences between Freud and Jung were put out in the public domain as rationalizations of the breakdown of the personal relations and political affiliations between the two men. This book emerged from a joint conference in 2012 by Fordham University and the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association to celebrate the centenary of the Fordham lectures. It is a rich assemblage of contributions demonstrating the current relevance of Jungian ideas for academia and science and should be welcomed in psychoanalytic circles for its affirmation of the creative potential in psyche and, above all, the capacity for symbolization wherein lies the prospect of going beyond historic splits. In addition, several chapters point to the contemporary Jungian approach as a syzygy of inner and outer reality making it essential reading for practitioners and scholars in their efforts to advance Jungian psychology as a key discipline for today.
Ann Casement, Licensed Psychoanalyst and
Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute and The Royal Society of Medicine
This fine book commemorates Jung’s achievement in his unjustly neglected Fordham lectures. It provides the most thorough contextualization of Jung’s ability, while still a Freudian, to constructively criticize psychoanalysis in the service of releasing its potential as a human science. It further shows how the Academy can still be refreshed in its present engagement with nature and politics by reintroducing itself, via Jung’s later work, to the legacy of romantic science, biblical hermeneutics, mythography, and Chinese philosophy.
John Beebe, author of Integrity in Depth
Encounters, debates, mutual questionings, and perspectives for future research one hundred years after Jung’s lectures at Fordham University—these are what one will find in this book which refreshes, nourishes, and expands our thinking about the relationship between Jungian psychoanalysis and the Academy.
Christian Gaillard, former president of the Société française de psychologie
analytique and the International Association of Analytical Psychology and professor at the
National Academy of Fine Arts in Paris
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
  Mark E. Mattson, Frederick J. Wertz, Harry Fogarty, Margaret Klenck, and Beverley Zabriskie
I. JUNG’S LECTURES AT FORDHAM
1 JUNG’S BREAK WITH FREUD REVISITED:
METHOD AND THE CHARACTER OF THEORY IN PSYCHOANALYSIS
Frederick J. Wertz
2 ENERGY AND EMOTION:
C. G. JUNG’S FORDHAM DECLARATION
Beverley Zabriskie
3 THE 1912 INTERNATIONAL EXTENSION COURSE
IN MEDICAL AND NERVOUS DISEASES: THE INSTRUCTORS AND THE FORDHAM CONTEXT
Mark E. Mattson
4 CARL JUNG, BEATRICE HINKLE, AND
CHARLOTTE TELLER, THE NEW YORK TIMES REPORTER
Jay Sherry
II. JUNG: SCIENCE AND THE ACADEMY
5 JUNG, SCIENCE, GERMAN ROMANTICISM:
A CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVE
Joseph Cambray
6 JUNG: ROMANTIC, MODERNIST,
AND POST-MODERNIST: DISCUSSION OF DR. CAMBRAY’S CHAPTER
Martin A. Schulman
7 THE FADING OF C. G. JUNG IN THE ACADEMY
Frances M. Parks
8 A TALE OF TWO INSTITUTES: RESEARCH-LED TEACHING AND TEACHING-LED RESEARCH IN A JUNGIAN/ARCHETYPAL STUDIES DOCTORAL PROGRAM
Jennifer Leigh Selig and Susan Rowland
9 JUNG AND LABORATORY ETHNOGRAPHIES:
LAB AS LOCUS OF TRANSFORMATIVE RESEARCH
Farzad Mahootian and Tara-Marie Linné
III. JUNG: THE HUMANITIES AND BEYOND
10 JUNG, PSYCHIC REALITY, AND GOD
Ann Belford Ulanov
11 DISCUSSION OF DR. ULANOV’S CHAPTER
William J. Sneck, S.J.
12 UNBARRING SHEOL:
UNCONSCIOUS ILLUMINATIONS ON THE HISTORY, FORM, AND RECEPTION
OF THE HEBREW BIBLE
Tiffany Houck-Loomis
13 THE DEUS ABSCONDITUS AND THE
POST-SECULAR QUEST
Amy Bentley Lamborn
14 REVISITING CARL JUNG’S SEMINAR NOTES
ON THE IGNATIAN EXERCISES
Harry W. Fogarty
15 A FEELING OF KINSHIP WITH ALL THINGS:
ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY, DEEP ECOLOGY, AND PHENOMENOLOGY
Teresa Arendell
16 A JUNGIAN PERSPECTIVE ON THE MOST
IMPORTANT ISSUE OF OUR TIME—CLIMATE CHANGE
Dennis L. Merritt
17 HOW THE TREASURE OF COMPARATIVE MYTHOGRAPHY
WAS LOST IN LATE TWENTIETH-CENTURY HUMANITIES
John Davenport
18 WALKING THE STREETS:
NON-JUNGIAN REFLECTIONS ON THE JUNGIAN SUBJECT
Gustavo Beck
19 JUNG AND CHINESE CULTURE:
COMMENTS ON TRANSLATIONS OF CLASSIC CHINESE TEXTS, JUNG’S
COMMENTARIES AND CONVERSATIONS
Geoffrey Blowers
Editors’ and Contributors’ biographies:

Teresa Arendell, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst living and practicing in Maine. She is Professor Emeritus from Colby College, Maine, where she taught sociology. She specialized in and conducted qualitative research; presented papers at professional conferences for the thirty years she spent in academia; published numerous peer-reviewed articles covering topics of family, gender, sexualities, women and aging, family, and social policy; and authored three books on family, divorce, and social policy. Her current work focuses on Jung, Nature and Psyche: The Wild, Wildness, and Wilderness, and on Jung as phenomenologist. She’s conducted workshops and lectures in the fundamentals of Jungian theory and practice, dream interpretation, mother-daughter relations, archetypes and cultural and individual complexes of aging and being aged, sense of place, the American cultural complex of wilderness, and nature, psyche, and place. She’s an active participant at the Boston C. G. Jung Training Institute where she serves on multiple committees. Experiencing the natural world and activities with her grandchildren are among her greatest delights. TeresaArendell.com.

Gustavo Beck, M.A. is a psychology professor at Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico City). He is also a translator of books and essays on psychology and the humanities, and a clinical psychologist with a private practice in Mexico City.

Geoffrey Blowers, Ph.D. [B.Sc. (Sheffield), M.Phil. (Sussex), Ph.D. (HK)] is currently Director of Studies and the Research Office at Hong Kong Shue Yan University. He is co-editor with Alison Turtle of Psychology Moving East: the status of Western Psychology in Asia and Oceania (Westview, 1987), co-author with Kieron O’Connor of Personal Construct Psychology in the Clinical Context (Ottawa/ Montreal, University of Ottawa Press, 1996) and has published papers on the history of psychology and psychoanalysis in China and Japan. He was twice President of the Hong Kong Psychological Society and is currently its Registrar. He is also Founding President of the Hong Kong Institute of Analytical Psychology.

Joseph Cambray, Ph.D. is President of the International Association for Analytical Psychology. He has served as the U.S. Editor for The Journal of Analytical Psychology and is on the Editorial Boards of The Journal of Analytical Psychology; The Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche; and the Israel Annual of Psychoanalytic Theory, Research, and Practice. He is a faculty member at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies; adjunct faculty at Pacific Graduate Institute; and former President of the C. G. Jung Institute of Boston. Dr. Cambray is a Jungian analyst in Boston, MA and Providence, RI. His numerous publications include the book based on his Fay lectures, Synchronicity: Nature and Psyche in an Interconnected Universe, and a volume edited with Linda Carter, Analytical Psychology: Contemporary Perspectives in Jungian Psychology. His most recent papers include “Cosmos and Culture in the Play of Synchronicity,” Spring Journal, 2012; “Jung, science, and his legacy,” in International Journal of Jungian Studies, 3:2, 110-124, 2011; “L’Influence D’Ernst Haeckel dans le Livre Rouge de Carl Gustav Jung,” in Recherches Germaniques, Revue Annuelle Hors Serie, 8, 41-59, 2011; and “Moments of complexity and enigmatic action: a Jungian view of the therapeutic field,” in Journal of Analytical Psychology, 56 (2) 296-309, 2011.

John Davenport, Ph.D. is Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University. He teaches and writes on ethics and political philosophy, moral psychology and agency (including free will, autonomy, and love), existentialism, and philosophy of religion (including comparative religion and myth). With Anthony Rudd, John co-edited the 2001 collection, Kierkegaard after MacIntyre, and the new collection on Love, Reason, and Will: Kierkegaard after Frankfurt (Bloomsbury, 2015). John has authored several other essays on Kierkegaard, including four recent articles on the structure of existential faith and selfhood in Fear and Trembling and other works. He published a monograph on motivation and volition titled Will as Commitment and Resolve in 2007, and Narrative Identity, Autonomy, and Mortality (Routledge, 2012). In addition to articles on global governance, he has recently published an article on “A New Existential Model of God: A Synthesis of Themes from Kierkegaard, Buber, Levinas, and Open Theism,” in Models of God (Springer, 2013).

Harry Wells Fogarty, M.Div., Ph.D. is a Jungian Analyst in practice in New York City. He also serves as a lecturer in psychiatry and religion at Union Theological Seminary, New York, and as a faculty member for the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association (JPA) and the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts (PAJA). His publications include “The Secret of Achebe’s Lion: Making Meaning of the Chronicity of the Intolerable” in Journeys, Encounters: Clinical, Communal, Cultural, Proceedings of the Seventeenth International IAAP Congress for Analytical Psychology, ed., Pamila Bennett; “A Jungian Perspective on Transcendence and Symbolization,” Issues in Psychoanalytic Psychology, vol. 30, no. 1, 2008; “The Ethical Attitude in Analytical Practice” in Proceedings of the Fifteenth International IAAP Congress for Analytical Psychology; and “Poisons and Panaceas in Analytic Training” in Destruction and Creation: Personal and Cultural Transformations, ed., Mary Ann Mattoon.

Margaret Klenck, M.Div., L.P. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in New York City. She is a graduate from the C. G. Jung Institute of New York, and holds a Masters of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary. Margaret is a past President of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association in New York, where she also teaches and supervises. Margaret has lectured and taught nationally and internationally. Recent publications include the opening essay in the second volume of Jung and Film, edited by Chris Hauke and Luke Hockney, which she co-authored with cinematographer Tom Hurwitz, ASC, and the entry on Jung in the newly revised, Psychoanalytic Terms and Concepts, published by Yale University Press

Tara-Marie Linné, M.S.W., L.C.S.W. is an independent scholar in NYC. She is nationally certified by the National Association of Social Workers and clinically licensed in four states. She received her B.S. in psychology from the University of Virginia and a Masters in Social Welfare from UCLA. She pursued postgraduate training through the Washington School of Psychiatry and conducted a private practice in Washington, D.C. She served as V.P. Legislative Affairs for the Greater Washington Society for Clinical Social Work and has been a member of the Washington Society for Jungian Psychology and Phoenix (AZ) Friends of C. G. Jung.

Tiffany Houck-Loomis, M.Div., Ph.D. is an analyst-in-training with the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association (JPA) in NYC; a part-time professor in the areas of Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Psychology; and the Director of the Doctor of Ministry program in Pastoral Care and Counseling at New Brunswick Theological Seminary. Her publications include “Broken Silence: An Interdisciplinary Study on Formed, Unformed, and Reformed Inherited Trauma,” a chapter forthcoming in an edited volume through Duquesne University Press (2015); “When Fast-Held God Images Fail to Meet Our Needs: A Psychoanalytic Reading of Job Chapters 6 and 7,” in Pastoral Psychology (2013); and “Good God?!? Lamentations as a Model for Mourning the Loss of the Good God,” in the Journal of Health and Religion (2012).

Farzad Mahootian, Ph.D. (Ph.D. Philosophy, M.S. Chemistry) teaches the Global Liberal Studies core at New York University. He has taught philosophy, science, and humanities courses for over twenty-five years. His research focus is the relevance of myth and metaphor to the history of philosophy and the sciences. Recent publications include “Jung and Whitehead on Intuition: An Interplay of Psychological and Philosophical Perspectives,” with T. Linné in Rational Intuition: Philosophical Roots, Scientific Investigations, eds., L. Osbeck and B. Held (Cambridge, 2014); and “Metaphor in Chemistry: An Examination of Chemical Metaphor,” in Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline (Springer, 2015).

Mark E. Mattson, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Psychology at Fordham University where he served as Associate Dean of Fordham College at Lincoln Center from 2009 to 2014 and as Associate Chair of Psychology for 14 years. He is a cognitive experimental psychologist with interests in the history of psychology at Fordham and in New York City, in errors and their implications for musical performances and theories of action and intention, and in the functions of autobiographical memory. His most cited article so far is his first: Erickson and Mattson (1981) on the Moses illusion.

Dennis Merritt, L.C.S.W., Ph.D. has a doctorate in entomology from UC-Berkeley, an MA in Humanistic Psychology from Sonoma State, and a diploma from the C. G. Jung Institute in Zürich. He is in private practice as a Jungian analyst in Madison and Milwaukee and author of the four volume Dairy Farmer’s Guide to the Universe—Jung, Hermes, and Ecopsychology (2012-2013). His blogs on “Hunger Games,” guns and the American psyche, and climate change are found at JungianEcopsychology.com and articles on sense of place and using the I Ching in an analytic setting at EcoJung.com.

Frances M. Parks, Ph.D., A.B.P.P. is a clinical psychologist and graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute Zürich. She has served as an administrator and faculty member in academic training programs. Clinical and analytic issues in aging are current areas of focus in her work. She is also exploring parallels in the experience of opera and the analytic process. She served as president of the Washington State Psychological Association and is a member of the C. G. Jung Institute of Seattle and of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts.

Susan Rowland, Ph.D. is Chair of MA Engaged Humanities and the Creative Life at Pacifica Graduate Institute, CA, and formerly Professor of English and Jungian Studies at the University of Greenwich, UK. She is author of a number of books on literary theory, gender, and Jung including Jung as a Writer (2005); Jung: A Feminist Revision (2002); C. G. Jung in the Humanities (2010) and The Ecocritical Psyche: Literature, Evolutionary Complexity, and Jung (2012). She also researches detective fiction with the book From Agatha Christie to Ruth Rendell (2001) and, forthcoming, The Sleuth and the Goddess in Women’s Detective Fiction.

Martin A. Schulman, Ph.D. was the Editor of The Psychoanalytic Review for sixteen years. He served on the Boards of Directors of the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis (NPAP), the Council of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapists (CPP), the International Federation for Psychoanalytic Education (IFPE), The South East Florida Institute for Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy (SEFIFPP), and the Harlem Family Institute, as well as the Editorial Boards of Psychoanalytic Psychology (Division 39 of the APA) and Psychoanalytic Books. He has coedited Failures in Psychoanalytic Treatment (IUP) with J. Reppen, Way Beyond Freud (Open Gate Press) with J. Reppen and J. Tucker, and Sexual Faces (IUP) with C. Schwartz. He has just completed with R. Kaplan a book on working with ultraorthodox religious patients. He is a committed Freudian (OMG).

Jennifer Leigh Selig, Ph.D. is the founding chair of the Jungian and Archetypal Studies program at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She is the co-editor and author of several books, including Reimagining Education: Essays on Reviving the Soul of Learning (2009); The Soul Does Not Specialize: Revaluing the Humanities and the Polyvalent Imagination (2012); Integration: The Psychology and Mythology of Martin Luther King, Jr. and His (Unfinished) Therapy With the Soul of America (2012); and A Tribute to James Hillman: Reflections on a Renegade Psychologist (2014).

Jay Sherry, Ph.D. teaches history and psychology at Long Island University–Brooklyn. He has presented his research on the life and work of Carl Jung in a variety of psychoanalytic publications and venues, most recently at the Freud Museum in London. His book Carl Gustav Jung, Avant-Garde Conservative (Palgrave Macmillan) received a 2011 Gradiva Award; he is now writing a book about the Jungian strand in American Modernism. For more, visit www.jaysherry.com.

William J. Sneck, S.J., Ph.D. an alumnus of University of Michigan, taught Pastoral Counseling at Loyola University, MD, as associate professor (1985–2000), and currently serves as the associate director for Jesuit Center, Wernersville, PA, as well as adjunct associate professor for Loyola Univ. in MD. He has authored Charismatic Spiritual Gifts: a Phenomenological Analysis (University Press of America, 1981); “Jung: Mentor for Pastoral Counselors,” in Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, 18 (2007), 35—51; and “Carl Jung and the Quest for Wholeness” in Robert J. Wicks (ed.) Handbook of Spirituality for Ministers, Volume 2 (Paulist, 2000, 196—213.)

Ann Belford Ulanov, M.Div., Ph.D., L.H.D. is the Christiane Brooks Johnson Professor of Psychiatry and Religion at Union Theological Seminary, a psychoanalyst in private practice, and a member of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association (NYC) and the International Association for Analytical Psychology. With her late husband, Barry Ulanov, she is the author of Religion and the Unconscious; Primary Speech: A Psychology of Prayer; Cinderella and Her Sisters: The Envied and the Envying; The Witch and The Clown: Two Archetypes of Human Sexuality; The Healing Imagination; Transforming Sexuality: The Archetypal World of Anima and Animus; by herself she is the author of The Feminine in Christian Theology and in Jungian Psychology; Receiving Woman: Studies in the Psychology and Theology of the Feminine; Picturing God; The Wisdom of the Psyche; The Female Ancestors of Christ; The Wizards’ Gate; The Functioning Transcendent; Korean edition of Our Religion and the Unconscious, Fall 1996; Korean edition of Primary Speech, 2000-2001; Korean edition of Cinderella and Her Sisters, 2002; Religion and the Spiritual in Carl Jung, 1999, reissued as Spirit in Jung, 2005; Finding Space: Winnicott, God, and Psychic Reality, 2001; Attacked by Poison Ivy, A Psychological Study, 2002; Italian edition of Cinderella and Her Sisters, 2003; Spiritual Aspects of Clinical Work, 2004; Czech edition of The Female Ancestors of Christ; The Unshuttered Heart: Opening to Aliveness and Deadness in the Self, 2007. The Living God and the Living Psyche, 2007; Madness and Creativity, 2009.

Ann Belford Ulanov is the recipient of an honorary doctorate from Virginia Theological School; an honorary doctorate from Loyola Graduate Department in Pastoral Counseling; an honorary doctorate from Christian Theological Seminary; the Distinguished Alumna Award from the Blanton/ Peale Institute; the Vision Award from the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis; the Oskar Pfister Award from the American Psychiatric Association for Distinguished Work in Depth Psychology and Religion; the Distinguished Contribution Award from the American Association of Pastoral Counselors for Distinguished Work in Depth Psychology and Religion; the Gradiva Award for best book in Psychiatry and Religion 2002 from the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis for Finding Space: Winnicott, God, and Psychic Reality.

Frederick J. Wertz, Ph.D., a professor at Fordham University since 1985, has written on the philosophy, theories, methodologies, and history of psychology as well as empirical research on various topics. He is the co-author of Five Ways of Doing Qualitative Analysis: Phenomenological Psychology, Grounded Theory, Discourse Analysis, Narrative Research, and Intuitive Inquiry (Guilford Publications); former editor of Journal of Phenomenological Psychology and Bulletin of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology; former President of APA Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology and APA Society for Humanistic Psychology and the Interdisciplinary Coalition of North American Phenomenologists; and 2014 Rollo May Awardee for pioneering work in humanistic psychology from the Society for Humanistic Psychology.

Beverley Zabriskie, L.C.S.W. is a Certified Jungian Analyst in New York City and a founding faculty member and former President of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association (JPA). Her recent publications include “Time and Tao in Synchronicity” (2014) in The Pauli-Jung Conjecture and Its Impact Today; “Psychic energy and synchronicity” (April 2014, Journal of Analytical Psychology); “Synchronicities: Riddles of Time and Emotion” (2012) in The Playful Psyche: Entering Chaos, Coincidence, Creation; “The One and Many Souls of New York” (2010) in Psyche and City: The Soul’s Guide to the Modern Metropolis; “When Psyche meets Soma: the question of incarnation” (2006) in Corrigal, J., Payne, H., and Wilkinson, H., (Eds.) About a Body. She also authored “A Meeting of Rare Minds” (2001), the Preface to Atom and Archetype: The Pauli-Jung Letters. She is a frequent national and international lecturer: bevzab@aol.com.