Spring: A Journal of Archetype and Culture and Spring Journal Books
Spring 90
$ 25.95

Spring 90: Jung and India

ISBN: 978-1-935528-60-9
418 pp.

Nancy Cater, J.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief
Al Collins, Ph.D., and Elaine Molchanov, LCSW, Guest Editors
Carl Jung's interest in India, and specifically in Hinduism and Buddhism, will be obvious to anyone who has even superficially read his work. Nevertheless, its significance is often ignored or minimized. This issue of Spring aims to show just how extensive and fraught Jung's ties to India were and to present attempts from a number of directions to plumb the meaning of the relationship and, in the spirit of active imagination, to "dream it onward" into the present and future. In this issue we will focus mostly on Jung's connections with Hindu thought. Buddhism and Hinduism in complex ways grew out of one another, so it is inevitable that there will be some overlap between the two. However, in spite of Jung's professed preference for Buddhism, he made much more use of Hindu (and pre-Hindu and pre-Buddhist Vedic) thought, as will be evident from the papers in this issue. We hope that Jung and India will open channels of thinking and practice with the potential to enrich Jungian understanding of Indian traditions and, equally, to stimulate creative interpretations and extensions of Jungian thought.

The papers for this volume fall rather clearly into four categories: (1) historical and comparative work integrating India and Jung (2) papers comparing and contrasting Jungian ideas with specific Indian traditions (3) Jungian interpretations of Hindu myths and rituals, and (4) personal memoirs combining Jungian and Indian themes. Despite the neat taxonomy, many of the papers touch on more than one category, and all in some way broach the fundamental questions that motivated this work in the first place: What unconscious, implied, nascent, or potential dialogue hangs poised in the field of thought and practice between Carl Jung's psychology and the 3500-year-old tradition of Indian thought? And what can we do to help it emerge for the benefit of both?

—from the Introduction
*****
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Guest Editors' Introduction Al Collins and
Elaine Molchanov
A Chronology of Jung and India
Editors' Note
PART I: JUNG AND INDIA
Churning the Milky Ocean: Poison and Nectar in Carl Jung's India Al Collins and
Elaine Molchanov
Jung's Hermeneutic of the Yantra and the Mandala: The Influence of Heinrich Zimmer's Kunstform und Yoga im indischen Kultbild Giovanni Sorge
India: An Odyssey of Individuation of an Ancient Civilization Ashok Bedi
PART II: JUNGIAN IDEAS AND INDIAN TRADITIONS
Self-Inquiry in C. G. Jung's Depth Psychology and Hindu Yoga Traditions Patrick Mahaffey
Jung and Consciousness Raja Selvam
Jung and Tantra Leslie Stein
PART III: MYTHS AND RITUALS
Samudra Manthana: Reflections on an Ancient Indian Myth Sulagna Sengupta
Bringing Dharma to Earth: The Sabarimalai Pilgrimage and Ayyappan Myth Michael A. Marsman
PART IV: PERSONAL MEMOIRS
The Cause: India and Psychoanalysis Ann Casement
C. G. Jung and India: Is a Mutual Understanding Possible? Manisha Roy
Parallel Journeys: On the Way to Jung and India Elaine Molchanov
JUNGIANA
Eleanor Bertine Chris Beach
FILM REVIEWS
Rhythms of a Life Letting Go: Images of Story, Self, and Meaning from Life of Pi, directed by Ang Lee Indhushee Rajan
Gandhi, directed by Richard Attenborough Steve Myers
BOOK REVIEWS
Trauma and the Soul: A Psycho-spiritual Approach to Human Development and Its Interruption, by Donald Kalsched Walter Boechat
The Dream and Its Amplification, Erel Shalit and Nancy Swift Furlotti, eds. Marcus West
Visible Mind: Movies, Modernity, and the Unconscious, by Christopher Hauke Helena Bassil-Morozow
Revelations of Chance: Synchronicity as Spiritual Experience and The Rupture of Time: Synchronicity and Jung's Critique of Modern Western Culture, by Roderick Main George B. Hogenson
Occupy Psyche: Jungian and Archetypal Perspectives on a Movement, Jordan Shapiro and Roxanne Partridge, eds. Ken Butigan
Lessons of the Inca Shamans: Piercing the Veil, by Deborah Bryon Mark Winborn
Heal Your Self with Writing, by Catherine Ann Jones Dianne Skafte
Guest Editors' Biographies
Al Collins, Ph.D., is on the adjunct faculty of Pacifica Graduate Institute and a former associate professor of East/West psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies. He is a clinical and cultural psychologist with particular interest in Indian psychological theories and Western depth psychologies (Jungian and Freudian). He is author of Fatherson: A Self Psychology of the Archetypal Masculine (1994) and many presentations, book chapters, and articles, most recently "The Three Selves of Indian Psychology and Psychoanalysis," in G. Misra, editor, Psychology and Psychoanalysis, vol. 13, part 3 of History of Indian Science, Philosophy, and Culture (2013).
Elaine Molchanov, LCSW, is a Jungian psychoanalyst in private practice in Anchorage, Alaska, and Chicago and a member of the Chicago Institute of Jungian Analysts. Formerly adjunct faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, she has practiced Siddha Yoga for more than thirtyfive years and analytical psychology for even longer. She is a board member of the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS). She is the author of "Kundalini the Serpent Energy" in Journal of Sandplay Therapy (2002) and many presentations. She is writing a book on her two life paths. Her latest presentation (with Al Collins) was "Soul in a Hyperactive World: ADHD as a Myth of Our Times."
Author Biographies (In order of appearance)
Al Collins, Ph.D., is on the adjunct faculty of Pacifica Graduate Institute and a former associate professor of East/West psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies. He is a clinical and cultural psychologist with particular interest in Indian psychological theories and Western depth psychologies (Jungian and Freudian). He is author of Fatherson: A Self Psychology of the Archetypal Masculine (1994) and many presentations, book chapters, and articles, most recently "The Three Selves of Indian Psychology and Psychoanalysis," in G. Misra, editor, Psychology and Psychoanalysis, vol. 13, part 3 of History of Indian Science, Philosophy, and Culture (2013).
Elaine Molchanov, LCSW, is a Jungian psychoanalyst in private practice in Anchorage, Alaska, and Chicago and a member of the Chicago Institute of Jungian Analysts. Formerly adjunct faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, she has practiced Siddha Yoga for more than thirtyfive years and analytical psychology for even longer. She is a board member of the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS). She is the author of "Kundalini the Serpent Energy" in Journal of Sandplay Therapy (2002) and many presentations. She is writing a book on her two life paths. Her latest presentation (with Al Collins) was "Soul in a Hyperactive World: ADHD as a Myth of Our Times."
Giovanni Sorge, Ph.D. (University of Zürich), after having studied in Venice (Department of History of Religions, Faculty of Literature and Philosophy), worked as assistant to the director of the Italian Institute of Culture in Switzerland. His dissertation was based on extensive archival research on Jung and the International Medical Society for Psychotherapy (1933–1940) at the Research Center for Social and Economic History of the University of Zürich (www.fsw.uzh.ch/personenaz/sorge.html). He works with the Philemon Foundation editing Jung's unpublished sources, teaches at the Jung Institute in Zürich, and serves as scientific advisor of the Eranos Foundation. This paper stems from some of the issues discussed in the process of editing the Berlin Seminar (under the supervision of S. Shamdasani, translated by M. Kyburz and J. Peck, and forthcoming in the Philemon Series). Unless otherwise indicated, translations from German are the author's.
Ashok Bedi, M.D., is a Jungian psychoanalyst and a board certified psychiatrist. He is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a clinical professor in psychiatry at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and a member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts. He is the liaison for the International Association for Analytical Psychology (IAAP) for developing groups in India and leads the annual study group "A Jungian Encounter with the Soul of India" to India under the auspices of the New York Jung Foundation. His books may be previewed at his website: www.pathtothesoul.com. He practices in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. An earlier incarnation of this article was presented at the IAAP Conference in Montreal in August 2010.
Patrick Mahaffey, Ph.D., is a core professor and associate chair of the Mythological Studies Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute, which he chaired for eighteen years. His teaching and research focus on Hindu and Buddhist traditions, comparative philosophy of religion, and contemplative practices. He has practiced Hindu forms of meditation for forty years, has participated in retreats at ashrams in India and Australia, and has lectured at the Parliament of World Religions in Melbourne. His publications include essays on Hindu yoga traditions, Buddhism, and religious pluralism. He is the editor of Evolving God-Images: Essays on Religion, Individuation, and Postmodern Spirituality (forthcoming).
Raja Selvam, Ph.D., is a senior trainer in Peter Levine's Somatic Experiencing (SE) professional trauma training programs and is the developer of integral somatic psychotherapy (ISP), an approach that is based on Eastern and Western psychology to improve outcomes in psychological processes through greater embodiment of body, energy, and consciousness dimensions. The article presented here is informed by more than twenty years of ongoing study and personal immersion in the practice of both Advaita Vedanta and Jungian psychology and is based in part on his clinical psychology doctoral dissertation, "Advaita Vedanta and Jungian Psychology: Explorations towards Further Reconciliation in East-West Dialogues on the Psyche."
Leslie Stein is the scholar in residence at Pace University in New York and an analyst in training at the C. G. Jung Institute of New York. He is the author of, among other works, Becoming Whole: Jung's Equation for Realizing God (2012), the Jungian allegory The Journey of Adam Kadmon: A Novel (2001, reprinted 2012), and "Global Warming: Inaction, Denial, and Psyche," in Spring, vol. 88. His article "Jung and Divine Self-Revelation" will appear in the Fall 2014 issue of Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche.
Sulagna Sengupta has an M.A. in English and certification in depth psychology from the Jung Center, India. She is a member of the Jung Center, India, and the International Association of Jungian Studies (IAJS). She works as an independent scholar in Jungian studies based in Bangalore, India. Her research interests include Indian myths, history, and culture and their interconnections with Jungian psychology. She is the author of Jung in India (Spring Journal Books, 2013). She is interested in humanistic education, ecological living, and contemporary art and theater.
Michael Marsman, LCSW-R, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City. He is a member of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association and serves on its faculty as well as its board. He also serves on the board of the Philemon Foundation. Marsman's research has focused on Hindu themes and mythology. Much of his practice consists of working with those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. This paper is an abridged version of a longer one with the same title.
Ann Casement, LP, is a senior member of the British Jungian Analytic Association, an associate member of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association, and the present chair of the Ethics Committee of the International Association for Analytical Psychology. She has published widely, including articles and reviews for the Economist, and is on the editorial advisory board of the Journal of Analytical Psychology and other international journals. She is currently on the 2013 Gradiva Awards Committee in New York.
Manisha Roy, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and a faculty member at the C. G. Jung Institute of Boston. She is a member of the International Association for Analytical Psychology and has been a member of the New England Society of Jungian Analysts since 1985. She has taught anthropology at the University of Chicago, the University of Colorado, California State University Long Beach, and the University of Zürich. She has lectured and held seminars and workshops in both anthropology and analytical psychology since 1971 in seventy-six cities of the world. She has published seven books and twentyseven articles in English and Bengali, including some fiction. Her first book, Bengali Women (1976), is now in its second edition and is available electronically.
Elaine Molchanov, LCSW, is a Jungian psychoanalyst in private practice in Anchorage, Alaska, and Chicago and a member of the Chicago Institute of Jungian Analysts. Formerly adjunct faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, she has practiced Siddha Yoga for more than thirty-five years and analytical psychology for even longer. She is a board member of the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS). She is the author of "Kundalini the Serpent Energy" in Journal of Sandplay Therapy (2002) and many presentations. She is writing a book on her two life paths. Her latest presentation (with Al Collins) was "Soul in a Hyperactive World: ADHD as a Myth of Our Times."
Chris Beach, J.D., is a Jungian analyst who practices in Portland, Maine. He is a member of the New England Society of Jungian Analysts and the Association of Graduate Analytical Psychologists. Earlier in life, he helped build and administer a secondary school in western Kenya and served as an assistant attorney general in Maine. As an analyst, he works with individuals and dream groups and teaches courses on psychological type, ethics, active imagination, and dream work. He serves on the Ethics Committee of the International Association for Analytical Psychology and has served as the chair of the Maine Jung Center. He is the author of two chapters, "Jungian Psychodrama" and "Using Psychodrama in Analysis," in Jung and Moreno: Essays on the Theatre of Human Nature, edited by Craig Stephenson (2013), and is working on a book on psychological type.
Indhushree Rajan, M.A., is a Ph.D. candidate and creator and director of Project Satori, which focuses on work with sex trafficking survivors. She is a clinical therapist for survivors of sexual abuse and domestic violence and at-risk youth and families with criminal, psychiatric, and substance abuse histories. Her publications include "Clinical Applications with Refugees" in Case Studies in Multicultural Counseling and Therapy (2013); "Voices from the Void: A Depth Psychological Re-conceptualization of Sex Trafficking in Modern-Day India" in Psychotherapy and Politics International (2011); and "The Gift of Voice: Providing Non-Profit Mental Health and Trauma Care for Women and Children in the Third World" in The High on Life Book (2010). She has presented papers at the American Psychological Association Convention, Orlando, Florida (2012), the International Conference of the International Association of Jungian Studies, Cardiff, Wales (2009), and the Multi-disciplinary Academic Conference of the International Association for Analytical Psychology, Zürich (2008).
Steve Myers holds a master's in Jungian and post-Jungian studies from the University of Essex and was winner of the Holt Prize. He is a part-time consultant working in the field of personal, team, and leadership development and a part-time Ph.D. student researching the topic of mythology for Christians. He has published two journal articles: "The Cryptomnesic Origins of Jung's Dream of the Multi-Storeyed House" in Journal of Analytical Psychology (2009) and "Psychological vs. Visionary Sources of Myth in Film" in International Journal of Jungian Studies (2012).
Walter Boechat, M.D., is a Jungian psychoanalyst and a diplomate of the C. G. Jung Institute, Zürich. A founding member of the Jungian Association of Brazil (AJB), he was a member of the Executive Committee of the International Association for Analytical Psychology from 2007 to 2013. He has a clinical practice in Rio de Janeiro.
Marcus West is a professional member of the Society of Analytical Psychology working in private practice in West Sussex, England. He is a member of the editorial board of Journal of Analytical Psychology and a previous book review editor. He is author of two books, Feeling, Being and the Sense of Self and Understanding Dreams in Clinical Practice.
Helena Bassil-Morozow is a cultural philosopher and film scholar researching the dynamic between individual personality and sociocultural systems in industrialized and postindustrial societies. Her books include Tim Burton: The Monster and the Crowd (2010), The Trickster in Contemporary Film (2011), and The Trickster and the System: Identity and Agency in Contemporary Society (forthcoming).
George B. Hogenson, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst practicing in Chicago and Oak Park, Illinois, and a senior training analyst at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago. He is past president of the Chicago Institute, a member of the Executive Committee of the International Association for Analytical Psychology, and on the editorial board of the Journal of Analytical Psychology. He is the author of Jung's Struggle with Freud and numerous articles on analytical psychology and the history of psychoanalysis.
Ken Butigan, Ph.D., teaches in the Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies Program at DePaul University in Chicago. He has helped build a series of movements for local and global transformation and has facilitated many workshops on the power of nonviolent change in our lives and our world. He is the executive director of Pace e Bene Nonviolence Service and has published five books, including Pilgrimage through a Burning World: Spiritual Practice and Nonviolent Protest at the Nevada Test Site (2003).
Mark Winborn, Ph.D., is a training analyst with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and the training coordinator for the Memphis Jungian Seminar. He is the author of Deep Blues: Human Soundscapes for the Archetypal Journey (2011) and the editor of Shared Realities: Participation Mystique and Beyond (forthcoming).
Dianne Skafte, Ph.D., is a retired professor of depth psychology, having served as the academic dean of Pacifica Graduate Institute. She is the author of Listening to the Oracle (1997) and numerous journal articles.